Last edited by Mikat
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

8 edition of Smallpox in the New World (Epidemic!) found in the catalog.

Smallpox in the New World (Epidemic!)

by Stephanie True Peters

  • 106 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Benchmark Books (NY) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Juvenile literature,
  • Technology - History,
  • Infectious Diseases,
  • Children: Young Adult (Gr. 10-12),
  • Juvenile Nonfiction,
  • Children"s Books/Ages 9-12 Science,
  • Smallpox,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Technology - Medicine,
  • History - United States/Colonial & Revolutionary,
  • America,
  • Diseases

  • The Physical Object
    FormatLibrary Binding
    Number of Pages69
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8016340M
    ISBN 100761416374
    ISBN 109780761416371

    The Wonders of Smallpox There are several epidemics in the world, but the one that stands out the most and has a large affect on people is smallpox. An epidemic is a widespread occurrence of and infectious disease in a community at a particular time.   To confuse matters further, a new, much less virulent smallpox virus named Variola minor appeared in the s, quickly supplanting Variola major in many parts of the world. This milder bug was not present in George Washington's day, and its emergence makes many twentieth-century studies unsuitable for assessing death rates in earlier times.4/4(6).

    How Europeans brought sickness to the New World By Heather Pringle Jun. 4, , PM In the Americas, the arrival of Europeans brought disease, war, and slavery to many indigenous peoples. The importance of smallpox, measles, and other Old World plagues in the conquest and settlement of the Americas by the Europeans was discussed in Chapter 4. A detailed description of the effect of smallpox virus on human civilization through the ages can be found in the book Princes and Peasants: Smallpox in History by D.R. Hopkins. The history.

      Historian Philip Ranlet of Hunter College and author of a article on the smallpox blanket incident in Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, also casts doubt. “There is . Smallpox, also called variola major, acute infectious disease that begins with a high fever, headache, and back pain and then proceeds to an eruption on the skin that leaves the face and limbs covered with cratered pockmarks, or pox. For centuries smallpox was one of the world’s most-dreaded plagues, killing as many as 30 percent of its victims, most of them children.


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Smallpox in the New World (Epidemic!) by Stephanie True Peters Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Smallpox in the New World (Epidemic!) (): Peters, Smallpox in the New World book True: BooksAuthor: Stephanie True Peters. Smallpox in the New World book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers/5.

Subsequent chapters then treat its history and search for a cure, the course it took during a particular time and in a particular place (the United States between and the early s in Polio, worldwide in in Influenza, and in the New World in Smallpox), and eventual success in creating vaccines or, in Influenza Pages: Smallpox in the new world.

[Stephanie True Peters] -- Describes the history of smallpox in the Americas, covering the arrival of the Spanish as carriers, its spread throughout the New World, the development of the smallpox vaccine, the elimination of.

Describes the history of smallpox in the Americas, covering the arrival of the Spanish as carriers, its spread throughout the New World, the development of the smallpox vaccine, the elimination of the disease, and its potential use as a terrorist weapon.

Smallpox is still a disease without treatment, a contagious disease with a high mortality rate, the victims dying a horrible death or else leaving them scarred for life.

This book has another huge plusit is written by D.L. Henderson, the leader of the very successful by:   English Describes the history of smallpox in the Americas, covering the arrival of the Spanish as carriers, its spread throughout the New World, the development of the smallpox vaccine, the elimination of the disease, and its potential use as a terrorist weapon Includes bibliographical references and indexPages:   Bill Gates: These 3 books 'opened a new world for me' Smallpox in History by Donald R Foege is surprised by how popular these books Author: Abigail Hess.

Although the smallpox vaccine has eradicated the disease, it was once a deadly disease that brought destruction to the native population in the New World (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The first recorded smallpox epidemic in the New World was in when it spread to Mexico and through South America (Mann, ).

The history of the entire worldwide effort to eradicate smallpox. Because of the scope of the program, the book is an overview and doesn't focus in much detail on any of the specific regions.

But there still is a lot of information packed into this conversational narrative. flag Like see review4/5. Smallpox – and other Deadly Eurasian Germs Much of the credit for European military success in the New World can be handed to the superiority of their weapons, their literary heritage, even the.

Book Recounts Challenges Of Eradicating Smallpox In Smallpox: The Death of a Disease, Dr. D.A. Henderson recounts the history of the deadly virus, from the. In North America smallpox wiped out 90% of the Native American population on the Massachusetts coast ().

Overall, some estimates say that 90 - 95% of the native population of the New World died due to smallpox. And it's not just the new world: The Plague of Athens in B.C. may have been smallpox (33% mortality rate)File Size: 77KB.

SMALLPOX IN COLONIAL NEW ENGLAND. by STANLEY M. ARONSON and LUCILE NEWMAN. Introduction “Because of the destroying angel standing over the Town, a day of prayer is needed that we may prepare to meet our God.” Thus wrote Cotton Mather in as his Boston congregation faced the return of smallpox.

How One Daring Woman Introduced the Idea of Smallpox Inoculation to England British writer and explorer Lady Mary Wortley Montagu ( - ). Portrait by Sir Godfrey Kneller, After first contacts with Europeans and Africans, some believe that the death of 90–95% of the native population of the New World was caused by Old World diseases.

It is suspected that smallpox was the chief culprit and responsible for killing nearly all of the native inhabitants of the Americas. Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.

The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in Octoberand the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the global eradication of the disease in The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among ms: Early: Fever, vomiting, mouth sores, Later:.

Smallpox — the death of a disease, written by D.A. Henderson, provides a personal accounting of the strategies, decisions, and combined global efforts leading to Cited by: 1. Industrialization in some societies often led to soaring demand for commodities they could not easily produce at home, so rubber, cotton, jute, and other primary products became enormous sources of potential profit.

as an era of 'proto-globalization', in the loose sense of a world with much more frequent and influential. Perhaps the most defenseless victims of smallpox were the Aztec and Inca Indians of the New World who, with no immunity to European diseases, were almost completely wiped out by Author: Heather Whipps.

InHernando Cortes, the Spanish conqueror of Mexico, is believed to have unintentionally brought a smallpox-infected slave with him to the New World.

In .The disease decimated Europe and traveled with colonists to the New World, laying waste to tribes and aiding British soldiers who spread the virus as a biological weapon. Today, the high fevers, deep rashes and oozing pustules that characterize smallpox are gone -- a feat of disease eradication so far unequaled in the history of public health.Ina year when some 10 million to 15 million people contracted smallpox, the World Health Organization launched a worldwide eradication campaign based on vaccination.