Last edited by Dum
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

5 edition of Psychosocial Aspects of Chemotherapy in Cancer Care found in the catalog.

Psychosocial Aspects of Chemotherapy in Cancer Care

The Patient, Family, and Staff

  • 304 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Haworth Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social aspects,
  • Psychology,
  • Drug Therapy,
  • Psychological aspects,
  • Psychotherapy - General,
  • Oncology,
  • Chemotherapy,
  • Cancer,
  • adverse effects

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsRobert Debellis (Editor), Austin H. Kutscher (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8329042M
    ISBN 100866566279
    ISBN 109780866566278

    Cancer I: General Aspects /87 $+ Psychosocial Aspects of Cancer in the Elderly Jimmie C. Holland, MD* and Mary Jane Massie, MDf Since 50 per cent of all cancers occur in people over 65 years of age, there is a need to understand the psychosocial problems facing the elderly person who has cancer.7 Indeed, with the aging of our population, the importance of anticipating. Being able to use the evidenced‐based literature currently available, regarding the psychosocial dimensions of the cancer experience in adolescents and young adults, will likely aid healthcare providers in understanding the psychosocial needs of adolescents or young adults with cancer and in better planning for their care. Elements critical.

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines for Psychosocial Care of Cancer Patients () The first clinical practice guidelines in the US were developed by NCCN in To avoid the stigma associated with psychological terms, the word ‘distress’ was chosen because if you have cancer, it is normal to be distressed. Fetting JH: Psychosocial and other supportive aspects of breast cancer care. Curr Opin Oncol , Fetting JH: Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer. Curr Opin Oncol , Fetting JH: Evaluating quality and quantity of life in breast cancer adjuvant trials. J Clin Oncol ,

    The family’s reactions will determine the pace and flow of the conversation. Table provides common reactions and suggestions for working with children at different developmental levels at the time of diagnosis and throughout cancer care. Table provides common parental reactions and suggestions for psychosocial intervention throughout the care of the : Meg Tippy. Book Category - Any - Advanced Practice Nursing Career Development Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Evidence-Based Practice Geriatrics Nursing Essentials Patient Resources Psychosocial Site-Specific Cancer Care Skin Care/Radiation Standards Transplantation.


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Psychosocial Aspects of Chemotherapy in Cancer Care Download PDF EPUB FB2

Leading medical professionals--physicians, nurses, social workers--who treat cancer patients receiving chemotherapy address vital areas of concern: physician/patient relationships, the psychosocial issues of being a patient, the pediatric patient, and new : $ Contents Physician/Patient Relationships Chemotherapy: An Oncologist's Overview Psychosocial Aspects of Chemotherapy Emotional Strain on Physicians Caring for Cancer Patients The Relationship Between Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Their Sorrow, Our Sorrow Psychosocial Issues in Being a Patient Ethical Dilemmas in Cancer Chemotherapy Choices: Risks Versus Benefits Chemotherapy and the Issue of Patients' Rights Patients' Perceptions of the Impact of Chemotherapy.

Psychological Aspects of Cancer: A Guide to Emotional and Psychological Consequences of Cancer, Their Causes and Their Management opens with two essays on the biological basis of emotion/mental-driven body processes and disease. The consequence of such considerations is that since thoughts and emotions can be modulated and changed by health care professionals, psychological counseling.

Psychosocial Dimensions of Oncology Nursing Care examines not only patient concerns but also the issues that family and healthcare professionals encounter during the cancer experience. The latest edition features new updates and perspectives on common aspects of psychosocial nursing care, including patient and family issues, communication, spirituality, body image, sexuality, survivorship, death, dying, and grief, and caregiver burden.

Barriers to the Delivery of Psychosocial Care. Many studies focusing on the need assessment for patients with cancer have shown that at an average of 32% of cancer patients report the need for psychosocial care [] covering a wide range of various psychosocial commonly reported needs include help with coping with anxiety, depression, and fear of recurrence or Cited by: Cancer: Psychosocial Aspects.

or concentration, experienced by patients with cancer who have had chemotherapy. CRCD can have a significant negative effect on a patient's quality of life. Having examined the evidence presented in Chapter 1 about the prevalence of psychosocial problems among people with cancer and the extent to which those problems are unaddressed by health care providers, as well as the evidence reviewed in this chapter about how psychosocial problems can adversely affect health, the committee concludes that all Author: Nancy E Adler, Ann Ek Page, Families in a Community Setting.

knowledge and expertise in psychosocial care and calling MASCC members to establish and promote psychosocial care as an integral component of supportive care in cancer.

Psychosocial concerns in cancer patients: met and unmet needs The basic psychosocial issues of all cancer patients can be classified according to concrete and practical categories. This development is consistent with the IOM report's view that the essential components of survivorship care include intervention for the consequences of cancer treatment.

23 Among the longer-term consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment that were identified in the IOM report are several that can be addressed through psychosocial care (eg, emotional distress, sexual dysfunction, and employment and insurance concerns).

23 Stanton 24 highlights the importance of providing psychosocial. Artherholt SB, Fann JR. Psychosocial care in cancer. Current Psychiatry Reports ;14(1) [PubMed Abstract] Fashoyin-Aje LA, Martinez KA, Dy SM.

New patient-centered care standards from the Commission on Cancer: opportunities and challenges. Journal of Supportive Oncology ; e-pub ahead of print Ma [PubMed Abstract]. Helping the cancer patient to cope with and overcome the difficulties associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a rapidly expanding field of interest.

Much of this interest has arisen from an increasing awareness of the high levels of psychological morbidity and the concern that patients, often receiving aggressive physical treatments, should have a good quality of : Hardcover.

Search for cancer related clinical trials and download our clinical trials app. Cleveland Clinic’s Taussig Cancer Institute has offered an array of support services to cancer patients and families for several years, says staff clinical psychologist Beth Gardini Dixon, in recent years, the Cancer Institute has devoted additional resources to psychosocial needs.

The burden of cancer in the worldwide context continues to grow, with an increasing number of new cases and deaths each year.

A significant proportion of cancer patients at all stages of the disease trajectory will suffer social, emotional and psychological distress as a result of cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Psychosocial interventions have proven efficacious for helping patients and. The psychosocial impacts of chemotherapy have become more significant for patients than physical side effects such as nausea and vomiting. To identify the positive and negative psychosocial impact of cancer, participants completed a modified version of the 18‐item Life Impact Checklist.

7, 21 Nine of the 18 items were from the original checklist that was used in a study of breast cancer survivors, 21 and 9 items related to other life domains (body image, future goal setting. Cancer and Cancer Care is a complete study of cancer, the care of people with the disease and its impact on everyday life.

Addressing the physical and psychosocial aspects of the illness in detail, it covers all fundamental aspects of cancer diagnosis, treatment, survival and aspects of psychosocial support for all those affected by cancer.

Caring for patients with cancer can be challenging, especially for new oncology nurses or those working outside of cancer care.

This introductory course provides a foundation for providing care to patients experiencing a cancer diagnosis, treatment complications, or trouble coping.

You’ll cover a range of basic topics, from cancer biology, treatments, symptom management, and patient and family care. Overall, the incidence of cancer is higher in men than in women and higher in industrialized sectors and nations.

More than million Americans are diagnosed each year with cancer, affecting one of various body sites.; Cancer is second only to cardiovascular disease as a leading cause of death in the United States.; Although the number of cancer deaths has decreased slightly, more than Offers a succinct but comprehensive guide to psycho-oncological practice.

—Midwest Book Review Beginning with a practitioner-friendly overview of cancer risk, types of cancer, and common forms of treatment and side effects, this book provides a primer on patients' experiences and the language needed to interact with the medical : Cancer patients commonly receive chemotherapy and/or invasive investigations in the last days of their life, and sometimes are inappropriately intubated/admitted to intensive care.

Discussing end of life (EOL) care preferences with incurable cancer patients is frequently not undertaken until the last days of. Treat cancer Chemotherapy can be used to cure cancer, lessen the chance it will return, or stop or slow its growth.

Ease cancer symptoms Chemotherapy can be used to shrink tumors that are causing pain and other problems. Who Receives Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is used to treat many types of cancer. For some people, chemotherapy may be the only.Psychological aspects of cancer chemotherapy. Article and doctor-patient communication as the most important aspects of psychosocial care.

The findings suggest the guidelines adequately.Psychological Aspects of Cancer opens with two essays on the biological basis of emotion/mental-driven body processes and consequence of such considerations is that since thoughts and emotions can be modulated and changed by health care professionals, psychological counseling should be seen not only as a way to help patients cope, but also to influence the disease itself.